Author: Tim Young

The main desire of any parent is for their child to have the best life possible.

With that in mind, one of the things that a parent hopes for is that their child can navigate the world even in the worst of catastrophes.

That being said, there is still the small problem of determining what is too little and also what is just too much.
That is where Playful Preparedness excels, at striking a balance between the two. It is like a Goldilocks guide for child preparedness.

The exercises that you find inside the book are simple but very effective. There is nothing there that would make a child frightened or unwilling to at least practice survival skills.


The initial introduction is somewhat a little too “prepper” in it’s over the top scare tactics. I was a little off put at first by this and thought that maybe it was going to be overboard and heavy-handed in what it might offer.


I was then pleasantly surprised. The activities inside the book would be fun for small children. There was nothing here that would make a child uneasy for frightened.

I could see the value in the activities as well as their potential value for developing life skills.


Each game is broken down into six sections. These are Summary, Concepts Taught, Materials Required, Before the Activity, How to Play and Assessment.


The summary gives a brief explanation of the skill being taught. An example of one of the games called Guts!: Help your children become aware of the value of their “gut instincts” by discussing feelings in different scenarios.


Concepts taught is just that. For example, the author uses “Trusting Instincts” and “Fire Extinguishing Skills” as a couple of ideas.


Materials required are self-explanatory. A few of the games need some materials, most of which can be found in the home. Others require nothing besides your guidance.


Before the Activity, gives you tips on how to get ready for the game so that you can identify better scenarios or conditions that would be favorable to educating your child.


How to play, explains the game in detail and Assessment gives you as the parent a guide on what to look for and maybe advice on how to guide your child a little on the lesson learned.


The games are cute and simple. However, they are also effective at teaching children skills without causing life long trauma.


I recommend the book not only for Preppers but for anyone that is concerned with making sure that their child is capable and ready for different situations.

I can see how playing these games while a child is young could help develop confidence in a child, in their self-reliance and understanding of the world.